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Filtering by Tag: California

Waterfall Hunting at Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park

Ben Ashby

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While we were on our trip we made a point to stop along HWY 1 to see the waterfall at Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park in Big Sur. This spot, right on the edge of the state park is the perfect ten minute walk down a sidewalk to get the perfect views of the waterfall as it cascades into the Pacific. 

If you're doing this spot, there is a parking lot along the high way. The walk is fully paved and has few steps. If you're photographing this spot keep in mind that the waterfall isn't super close to the sidewalk. 

This is a good sunset spot, but the sunset sets opposite the waterfall, so you'd be photographing the colors casting light across the landscapes rather than directly into the sunset. 

To photograph this spot we used a Canon 5D IV with a 24-70 mm prime lens from BH Photo

Our Tips for Discovering Shark Fin Cove

Ben Ashby

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Lets take a moment and propose the idea that you're on the Pacific coast looking for a scene spot south of San Fransisco. May we suggest Shark Fin Cove. It is a short drive down from San Fransisco in Davenport, CA. 

 

The town is a tiny village along the Pacific Coast Highway. We suggest stopping here for breakfast and then hopping the couple of miles down the road to take in scenic cliff views. The cove gets its name from the large shark fin shape rock that sits just off the sandy shore. 

 

 

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Parking for this spot is a gravel lot along the highway. You'll want to wear hikeable shoes as the trek to the beach is down a make shift ditch/hill. Its about a five minute hike down the cliffside, but the dust and gravel make the hike a bit shaky. Once you're at the beach the hike is well worth it, but if you're unable to make it to the bottom the views from the top are equally amazing. 

The cove has a decent sized, and semi private beach. We always go for the photo moments along the rocks and caves. The tides are typically pretty loud and heavy. Be careful not to get your shoes wet. 

This is one of those spots to skip for sunrise or sunset. Do it in the middle of the day. The spot is unique for its fin shaped rock, not because of its sunset opps. 

 

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OUR TIPS:

  • Wear hiking shoes; its a short but dusty hike
  • To best capture the full shark fin bring a wide angle lens
  • Best hours to visit are mid day
  • It is one of the few beachy spots between SF and Big Sur

Whenever you're at any of the beaches along the coast, be a good citizen and collect the garbage that washes ashore. The over polluted Pacific has sadly started washing a depressingly high volume of garbage. 

We shot this spot with a Canon 5D IV with a 24-70mm lens

(I got a little slap happy shooting this bag strap for Native Sons Goods, so please excuse it in every photo)

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Finding the Happy || Our Guide to LA's Los Feliz

Ben Ashby

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Finding the Happy

Our Guide to LA's Los Feliz

 

Heath Stiltner takes us on a colorful walk through his favorite Los Angeles neighborhood—Los Feliz—to share a few of his top places to visit and things to see. With a rich Spanish-Mexican heritage and artistic influence Los Feliz is his favorite place to visit in LA when he wants that cool California vibe with a sense of history.

 


As I pulled on my olive green overalls, the strong smell of my first coffee of the day filled the small studio cottage my friend had offered to let me stay in for the week. I’d been to the City of Angels before, but had never stayed so long in this neighborhood—Los Feliz. With its lively and diverse small-town atmosphere it was hard not to feel right at home here. 

 

Bright and modern Spanish bungalows lined the street gently rolling through the neighborhood like old dirt roads recently paved, everywhere there was a feeling of the cool LA vibe version of a frontier town. You just can’t help but smile in Los Feliz, so a name which translates to “the happy” seems fitting—though it gets its name from its Spanish-Mexican colonial land grantee, Jose Vicente Feliz. Los Feliz is home to one of my favorite LA breakfast haunts, Sunset Junction Cafe. While I love the bright diner atmosphere of Sunset Junction, the thing that always brings me back is the amazing staff. (I live in Kentucky, and when I revisited the spot almost two months later they remembered me.) If you’re looking for that cinematic place where you can go work on your script and have amazing Eggs Benedict, this is your place. Sorry, I can’t guarantee James Franco will be sitting across from you, as well.

 

Full of coffee and eggs I go back out to explore the neighborhood, finding myself a comic nerd haven in Secret Headquarters, stopping for an American-made clothing fix with Buck Mason, and visiting several sets of hidden staircases for which Los Angeles is famous. Micheltorena & Prospect stairs are two such staircases in the Los Feliz neighborhood, Micheltorena is the more colorful of the two having been painted with hearts and rainbow colored risers. Los Feliz is a neighborhoods ideal for long strolls to discover hidden gems like these, and can be an amazing place for photographers looking to catch that authentic ‘sunny California’ vibe. 

 

With Griffith Park to its north, the Los Angeles River to the east, and Hollywood and the Hills to its south and west, Los Feliz is the neighborhood to visit when you want to see all that LA has to offer. In only one day you can walk from Alfred Coffee on the edge of Silver Lake, have breakfast at Sunset Junction, shop and browse your way down Sunset Boulevard, hit the vintage shops of Hollywood Boulevard, get the best view the Hollywood Sign and Griffith Park from the stunt Barnsdall Art Park property, and hike all the way over to Griffith Park itself. Los Feliz houses some of Los Angeles’ most famous architecture, and Barnsdall Art Park is no exception. Located at the crest of Olive Hill, Barnsdall Art Park is a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument that houses Hollyhock House designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright and commissioned by oil heiress Aline Barnsdall as an arts & theater complex. If you want to touch a part of LA’s architectural history and get one of the city’s best view, I suggest visiting Barnsdall.

 

After spending much of my trip hiking the urban landscape, an escape to Griffith Park with my friend Keegan was a necessity. When you want a peaceful hike and an escape from the busy streets, Griffith Park is your haven. Donated to the City of Los Angeles by Griffith J. Griffith in 1896, the Park has some of the best sweeping views of downtown LA, the Pacific Ocean, and the Hollywood sign—as well as free tours of the observatory.

 

After a long day packed with adventure, one needs to reflect with good friends and food. Making my way back down to the valley below, I stop for dinner in my favorite little Italian restaurant, La Pergoletta. Tucked away just off Hillhurst Ave., this gem makes some of the best pasta I’ve ever had in LA—and I love carbs. Taking a seat at one of the red and white gingham covered cafe tables outside I begin to unravel my day. The many faces and places I’d met in just just a day, and how many more lie in waiting just down the street. After devouring a large bowl of lobster ravioli and more bread than I care to admit, I start my walk back to the small artist’s studio At my friend’s home that I have grown to call home in LA. The giant cacti on seem to grow in the moonlight as I walk down Hillhurst Ave. It’s hard to believe that one small neighborhood can hold so much magic and history, but it’s not hard to believe the neighborhood where, sitting in his uncle’s garage, Walt Disney drew his first sketch of the world-beloved Mickey Mouse. Los Feliz feels like the hometown of Los Angeles, and it’s a hometown where everyone is welcome.

 

 

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Dinosaur Coffee, Los Angeles.

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Dinosaur Coffee, Los Angeles

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Hache LA, Los Angeles.

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Alfred Coffee, Los Angeles.

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Secret Headquarters, Los Angeles.

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Secret Headquarters, Los Angeles.

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Sunset Junction, Los Angeles.

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Sunset Junction, Los Angeles.

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Hollyhock House, Barnsdall Art Park, Los Angeles.

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Buck Mason mobile, Los Angeles.

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Los Feliz, Los Angeles.

 

— @heathstiltner

Mount Tamalpais

Ben Ashby

We'd seen the view in so many photos. A golden hill high above the fog and clouds. Paths cut through the dried grasses and fading into the clouds below. We knew we had to visit while we were in San Fransisco. Mount Tamalpais is just a very short drive north of the Golden Gate Bridge. The perfect sunset spot and a very easy hike. 

The following are images I shot at sunset near the peak of Mount Tamalpais with the Canon 5d Mark IV

"Just north of San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge, Mount Tamalpais State Park rises majestically from the heart of Marin County. Its deep canyons and sweeping hillsides are cloaked with cool redwood forests, oak woodlands, open grasslands, and sturdy chaparral. 

The breathtaking panorama from Mount Tamalpais’s 2,571-foot peak includes the Farallon Islands 25 miles out to sea, the Marin County hills, San Francisco Bay, the East Bay, and Mount Diablo. On rare occasions, the snow-covered Sierra Nevada can be seen 150 miles away.

The park offers superlative hikingpicnickingwildlife watching, and mountain and road bicycling." — ca.gov

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An Interview with Photographer Beau Simmons

Christophe Chaisson

Beau Simmons is a 26 year old photographer/cinematographer living in Laguna Niguel, CA. His fresh creative outlook provides amazing content that is never boring or repetitive. Whether it is landscapes or portraits, you can be sure his photography will be beautiful and the highest of quality. 


When did you first become interested in photography?
“I first became interested in photography at a pretty young age when my Father was a film photographer/sports journalist. It didn’t become a serious profession until about 2013 though.”

How did you develop your style?

“Lots of late nights spent on my computer and head banging to hard rock music.”

Were you self-taught or did you learn in school/from a mentor?
“Self-taught”

What themes do you explore through your work?
“I like to either capture old school 70’s/90’s looks or put the model in a very unique location/landscape.”

How do you find and choose you subjects or locations?
“I love to visit National Parks and find new places or I find random spots in neighborhoods with great lighting.”

What inspires your work?
“Always looking back at photos I’ve taken and thinking of new ways to recreate them.”

How do you compose an image? Do you go into the shoot with a specific shot in mind, or does the inspiration strike when you place your model in the setting?
“I tend to be pretty tedious with my shots. I usually put the outfits, poses, and locations in my notes and just shoot until I have everything I wanted.”

What has been your biggest lesson learned through creating your art?
“Don’t look at other photographer’s work. Stick to one style.”

What do you hope your art says to people?
“This shit is amazing.”

Check him out on Instagram @beausimmons to continue seeing moments of beautiful people in stunning places. We have enjoyed following Beau for a while now and it was a privilege to get together and hear more of his journey as a photographer. 

Ol' Frank & Mary Kate

Christophe Chaisson

My name is Mary Kate Teske. I'm a twenty-two year old photographer from Billings, MT. I grew up in Terry, MT and was influenced early on in the realm of photography by the local wonder, Evelyn Cameron. Her work portrays the natural elements of everyday life, and with my work, I try to do the same.

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That being said, a lot of perspective from my life can be found in the view behind the steering wheel of a classic car. When I was fifteen, I rebuilt a 1961 Dodge Lancer by the name of Ol' Frank with my family. The car actually came from my grandfathers farm in Terry, MT. My siblings and I growing up would spend summers on the farm working and one year my grandpa proposed the idea of restoring Ol' Frank. I jumped right in. Since then, he, and the rest of my family for that matter, has restored and given a classic car to each one of his grandchildren. 

  During the past seven years of driving it, I dreamt of taking it on a road trip and always thought of the places I would go. Recently, the season in my life allowed me to fulfill that dream. I spent June and half of July of 2016 driving along the west coast. In total, I think I averaged more than 7,000 miles. I left from Billings, MT and traveled through Idaho, Washington, Oregon, California, Arizona, Utah, Wyoming and back and took photos along the way. While on the road, I slept in my car and stayed with friends. I met a ton of inspiring people and hope to take another trip sometime soon. Hopefully to the east coast!

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On a side note, I do NOT recommend driving through the hottest parts of the country without any AC. Most of the trip I spent driving while holding a huge bag of gas station ice in my lap.

Mary Kate's Instagram : @marykateteske

Frank's Instagram : @olfrankteske 

#FOLLOWFRANK